Tag Archives: Illustration

Review: ‘Freehand Figure Drawing For Illustrators: Mastering the Art of Drawing from Memory’

Human-Figure-Drawing-Watson-Guptill

Whether you are an artist, or would like to be, being able to draw without a model, but from memory, can be a challenge. With David H. Ross, you are definitely learning from the best. Mr. Ross has worked with all the major North American comic book publishers including Marvel Comics, DC Comics, and Dark Horse Comics. I can tell you, as an artist myself, that he knows numerous techniques that do indeed make it possible to work from memory. Look no further than his new book, “Freehand Figure Drawing For Illustrators: Mastering the Art of Drawing from Memory,” published by Watson-Guptill Publications, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

Here you will find the time-honored methods and practical guidelines that you need. In a lot of ways, it all seems rather easy and Ross makes that possible with very clear examples, one step at a time. I believe that clearing all the clutter is essential in art instruction. You address one aspect, focus on that, and move on to the next. Ross begins with the first place you need to go and that’s the space that your model inhabits. If you’ve ever felt a need for a refresher on perspective, you’ll find it here.

David-H-Ross-Drawing

The basics and then some, that’s what this book offers. I have fond memories of art school and having my trusty little wooden mannequin as well as a skeleton and skull to keep me company. But, with this book, you find ways to internalize that reference. That’s a key point. So, when you do have your model in the flesh, you can work faster as you go deeper into your interpretation. Anatomy, posture, bone structure, all of this will already be stored away and allow you to concentrate on the unique character of your model. And, of course, with this book’s guidance, you can always work without a model at all.

“Freehand Figure Drawing” is a 208-page trade paperback, published by Watson-Guptill, an imprint of Penguin Random House, and is available as of July 28th. For more details, visit our friends at Penguin Random House right here.

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Filed under animation, Art, Art books, Comics, Education, Illustration, Penguin Random House, Watson-Guptill Publications

Art: SPRING LIFT

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Here’s a new painting I did entitled, “Spring Lift.” First day of spring is this Friday, March 20! This painting incorporates thoughts of Seattle in the spring and the Macefield Home, a symbol of resistance.

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Filed under Art, Ballard, Edith Macefield, Henry Chamberlain, Illustration, Painting, Seattle

Review: ‘Magpie, Magpie’ by Matt Huynh

Magpie-Magpie-Matt-Huynh

Can you ever force someone to love you? No, but that’s never stopped anyone from trying. This question is handled in a grand gothic manner in “Magpie, Magpie,” a webcomic now available in print, by Matt Huynh.

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Matt Huynh provides a good honest expressive line throughout this multi-tiered dreamy tale of love on the run, running towards and away from itself. This is dream logic run amok. It’s wading into a Faulknerian swampland. And it’s fun, of course. It’s best to read through a couple of times and just let yourself get lost in it. A father is frantically running to find and connect with his young daughter while he’s also hashing out his precarious relationship with his girlfriend. Meanwhile, a persistent suitor has his eyes on the same girlfriend. All of this is rendered in a vibrant gestural style evoking the madness at play.

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This is the sort of work that I most easily relate to. It’s poetic, experimental, and open-ended. The sense of spontaneity that Huynh achieves with his sumi ink is pretty solid. I think there are some awkward passages and stilted depictions but that’s alright. Overall, Huynh leads the eye to interesting sidesteps and detours. As a webcomic, he adds some fun tweaks: there are scenes that fade in and out and magpies that actually flutter in the wind. It will be interesting to see what Huynh does when he attempts a more substantial larger scale work. That, I don’t doubt, will require tightening up in places. As for this short audacious piece, it hits the mark in pleasing ways.

Be sure to visit Matt Huynh and check out his compelling illustrations and comics right here.

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Filed under Comics, Illustration, Webcomics

Review: ‘Trepanation: Elective Surgery You Need Like A Hole in the Head’

Emi-Gennis-Trepanation

Trepanation, the controversial elective surgery, is not for everyone, to say the least. However, “Trepanation: Elective Surgery You Need Like A Hole in the Head,” the minicomic by Emi Gennis, is for everyone to enjoy. This latest work, which originally appeared on The Nib, is now available in print.

So what on earth is trepanation? It is the creation of a hole in the skull believed to relieve pressure and return you to the blissful state you were supposedly in as an infant. You will find this to be both hilarious and informative, and how often does that happen? Not often enough. Emi Gennis continues to work with some of the most downright strange content that any cartoonist has dared to tackle.

Visit Emi Gennis, learn about her work, and check out where you can get her comics right here.

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Filed under Comics, Emi Gennis, Minicomics

Jeremy Eaton Holiday Art Show in Seattle, Saturday, December 13, Noon to 6pm

Holiday-Art-Show-Jeremy-Eaton-Studios

For our Seattle readers, be sure to stop by and check out the boldly ironic paintings of one of Seattle’s favorite sons, Jeremy Eaton. He regularly graces the pages of our favorite alternative weekly, The Stranger. Jeremy Eaton is a published cartoonist, illustrator and painter living in Seattle. For his paintings he utilizes discarded plywood he finds in the shipyards of the city, applying acrylic paint in bold splashes of color and overlapping strokes of black in order to replicate the pulp printing of the comic books and magazines of his youth, often sublimating this with wider cultural themes and commentary. Be sure to visit Jeremy right here.

More details follow from Jeremy Eaton:

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Filed under Art, Comics, Illustration, Jeremy Eaton, Painting, Seattle, The Stranger

Movie Review: FROM INSIDE, Directed by John Bergin; Original Music by Gary Numan & Ade Fenton

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John Bergin is a very interesting illustrator. He’s out there. He’s got a touch of gonzo to his style. He’s a cross between Ralph Steadman, Dave McKean and Tomi Ungerer. Just the sort of chap you’d want to guide you through a dystopian nightmare such as “From Inside,” his animated adaptation to his graphic novel of the same name.

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Filed under animation, Comics, Dave McKean, John Bergin, Ralph Steadman, Tomi Ungerer

Review: WORDLESS Tour with Art Spiegelman and Phillip Johnston

WORDLESS at The Moore Theatre, October 12, 2014

WORDLESS at The Moore Theatre, October 12, 2014

Imagine the most dazzling art lecture of your dreams complete with live music or, better yet, imagine something like Oscar Wilde touring America in 1882. Art Spiegelman presenting an art lecture accompanied by the Phillip Johnston Sextet is pretty unusual, special, and rare. An audience in Seattle this last Sunday, October 12, enjoyed such a treat and in the most fitting venue, The Moore Theatre, Seattle’s oldest operating theatre, dating back to 1907. A fitting site since Mr. Spiegleman was here to discuss, embrace, and celebrate the comics medium dating back to a bygone era.

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Filed under Comic Book Art, comic books, Comics, Frans Masereel, H.M. Bateman, Lynd Ward, Milt Gross, Otto Nuckel, Seattle, Si Lewen

Review: ‘Your Illustrated Guide To Becoming One With The Universe’ by Yumi Sakugawa

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Yumi Sakugawa presents the reader with engaging and helpful guidelines on how to balance your life in her new book, “Your Illustrated Guide To Becoming One With The Universe.” If such a title did not exist before, it seems like it was only a matter of time before someone would use it. How nice that Ms. Sakugawa should enjoy that privilege. Any number of cartoonists could create something similar, and probably more should. What this book demonstrates is an authentic voice speaking to the little leaps of faith that we all wish to take.

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Filed under Comics, Eckhart Tolle, Elliot Bay Book Company, Metaphysics, Self-Help, Short Run Small Press Fest, Yumi Sakugawa

Illustration: HEALTH ROCKS! by Dalton Webb

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It is always a pleasure to see illustrations by creatives who work both in comics and illustraion. Dalton Webb is a triple threat as an illustrator, graphic designer, and cartoonist. As we bid farewell to summer and make our way into cold and flu season, Dalton Webb has a spectacular set of illustrations and design work entitled, “Health Rocks!” For us locals, we were treated to the whole campaign in our Seattle Times Sunday supplement. This same supplement is now available at your local Bartell’s and is full of useful information as you follow along the adventures of The Five Senses.

Illustration-Dalton-Webb

You can find our friend Dalton Webb at his website right here.

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Filed under Cartoonists, Comics, Dalton Webb, Design, Graphic Design, Illustration, Seattle

Review: WORDS FOR PICTURES: THE ART AND BUSINESS OF WRITING COMICS AND GRAPHIC NOVELS

Art by Walter Simonson

Art by Walter Simonson

Have you ever thought that you could write a comic book script if you had the opportunity? Well, here’s a book that not only demystifies the world of comic book writers but provides great food for thought for any writer or any creative person, for that matter. It’s by Brian Michael Bendis. You will know the name if you’re into comics.

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Filed under Art books, Brian Michael Bendis, Comics, Education, Marvel Comics