Tag Archives: Science Fiction

Interview: François Vigneault and TITAN

François Vigneault

Here is an interview with cartoonist, illustrator and designer François Vigneault. We chat about his graphic novel, TITAN, and related matters. The French edition of TITAN was nominated for multiple awards including the Prix des Libraires and the Joe Shuster Award, and now we finally have the English edition published by Oni Press and available as of November 10, 2020.

TITAN by François Vigneault

TITAN, a graphic novel set during a worker’s revolt has, like any good science fiction, a “torn from the headlines” relevance to it. Politics and protest are clearly on the forefront now. In the U.S., we have one of the most consequential presidential elections in history. It will be a brave new world, on so many levels, that we will all enter into later this year. So, an intriguing sci-fi thriller graphic novel will definitely fit right in. For this interview, I ask François about the book and, specifically about the two lovers caught in the middle. We also discuss the whole process of creating comics, moving up the ranks as an independent cartoonist, and the life of an artist in Montreal, Quebec.

Hope you enjoy the video interview. Here is some additional material exclusive to this post:

What authors did you turn to for guidance or inspiration for TITAN?
There were definitely a big mix of influences and inspirations over the years, but I will mention a few that pop out to me:
Grendel Tales: Devils and Deaths by Darko Macan and the late Edvin Biuković is a comic I first read as a teenager and it had a big influence on me, like TITAN it is a story of love during wartime and I think anyone who enjoys my book will appreciate this somewhat underrated gem… Biuković’s untimely death was a real loss to the world of comics.
Italo Calvino is one of my favorite authors; most of his work is very, very different from what I am doing, but one of my favorite volumes by him is Difficult Loves, which includes a range of tales ranging from “Wartime Stories” to “Stories of Love and Loneliness” which definitely had an influence on TITAN. I know I reread that book at least twice during the creation of TITAN.
Finally, I think probably the biggest influence on me for the last decade or so has been the late, great Ursula K. LeGuin; she somehow manages to surprise me again and again over the years. Every time I think I have her figured out, or know what to expect from her, she throws another curveball (or perhaps a right hook is a more appropriate metaphor) and I’m left pleasantly dazed by the experience. The singular way that LeGuin would mix interpersonal pain with cultural conflict has been and remains a tremendous influence on my work. I had the privilege of meeting her very briefly back when I lived in Portland, and I am so glad that I had that opportunity, even if all I did was gush about her work and get my ratty old copies of Earthsea signed.
What would you like to share about the writing, the subtext, to TITAN?
That question is very open to interpretation! So I’ll just briefly say that despite the many dark elements to the plot, the corruption, violence, and inequality that is present throughout the book, I do think that TITAN is ultimately a hopeful story, a story about the capacity of human beings to connect with each other.
How do you think TITAN mirrors our society today and what is timeless in your work?
I do think so, though I will leave it to others to decide if the mirror that TITAN holds up to our world is interesting, useful, or just plain boring. Definitely the book is very much inspired by our world, and sometimes feels eerily prescient in how very closely it maps to events that are unfolding right now (keep in mind I finished writing TITAN back in 2017), it is disturbing, to tell the truth. ButI suppose that shows that some of TITAN’s themes of injustice, state-sanctioned violence, and the cruel indifference of capitalism to human suffering are certain to be with us for a long, long time. But as I mentioned earlier, there is also a theme of connection, love, and reconciliation that is present in the book as well, and I hope that those ideas are timeless as well.

Be sure to visit François Vigneault at his website right here.

Excerpt panels from TITAN

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Review: TITAN by François Vigneault

TITAN by François Vigneault

Titan. by François Vigneault. Oni Press, Portland, OR, 2020. 202pp, $19.99.

François Vigneault is one of the most original and fun cartoonists out there today. If you have not checked out his Titan comics, this is the perfect time since Oni Press presents a new collection of the series coming out November 10, 2020. Consider this an advance review. I will follow up with another Titan-related post closer to the release date. It is often said that the best science fiction has a timeless quality as well as comments with precision on its own time. Titan certainly is relevant to our tumultuous times full of protest. Meet João da Silva and Phoebe Mackintosh: one is a member of the ruling elite; the other is a member of the exploited working class. It is the not-too-distant future, about a hundred years from now. The old mining colony of Homestead, on a moon of Titan, is steadily working its way to obsolescence. In order to try to salvage the situation, MGR First Class da Silva arrives on the scene from HQ, planet Terra. His liaison officer is one of the best workers, Phoebe. What could go wrong? For starters, João and Phoebe immediately sense some hot chemistry between them. Meanwhile, the entire order of things is coming apart at the seams.

Page from TITAN

Vigneault has a very vivid and direct drawing style. Whether he draws with a pen and paper or directly on a digital tablet, he has nailed quite a fluid and expressive line. This is a wonderfully cartoony style with an immediate impact that attracts the reader to the characters and action. Vigneault has a way of evoking emotion that holds its own with any other drawing style with its authenticity. I don’t feel a false note anywhere. Any reader will get hooked into what becomes of João and Phoebe and, by extension, the rest of Homestead, even the whole freaking solar system! In the grand science fiction tradition, the fate of worlds depends upon these two–but also with a touch of irony to boot. This isn’t your father’s sci-fi, after all.

I’ll tell you one thing. Vigneault manages to pull off one of the trickiest of metaphors. In lesser hands, I think this would have felt like a heavy-handed gambit. The ruling class from Terra appear tiny in comparison to the Titan workers, genetically modified for maximum efficiency. When João and Phoebe become lovers, the symbolism is totally brought home, and the stark contrast is pretty powerful, even beautiful. João and Phoebe, as different as they are, fit together. João is small and nimble. Phoebe is large and strong. João can’t help but bring up his concern over whether he is big enough for her to which Phoebe reassures him that “size doesn’t matter.” Over the course of their story, the reader comes to appreciate how right they are for each other.

Panel excerpt: Phoebe reassures João.

Comics and graphic novels share much in common. If a comic strip, for example, is done right, it will entice the reader to go through it more than one quick scan. A reader may not even be fully aware of it but it is likely that the comic strip is digested a number of times, as in a loop. The reader seeks the stimulation and goes for repeated rewards. And then it’s time to move on to something else. But, at that moment, a comics loop experience is enjoyed. And so it can, and does, happen with graphic novels. There are certain passages that must be re-visited. Pages to go back to, pages to compare. Some academics theorize that comics are read in an entirely different way when displayed on a gallery wall and perhaps that even hurts the comics experience. Well, I don’t buy it. I say all this because Vigneault has managed to find that sweet spot in making comics where his creation entices the reader to linger, to re-visit, and to revel in the work. Not all comics do that and perhaps some comics creators don’t even factor that in. But Vigneault does.

I really good novel, or movie, or graphic novel, invites repeated consumption. It is built-in. That is going on here with Titan, a story of two star-crossed lovers caught up in events bigger than themselves. If the characters are compelling, the events in question can recede into the background and come up to the forefront as needed. Not all novels are created equal, of course! The point here is that Vigneault, in the driver’s seat as a auteur cartoonist (both writer and artist), fully understands how to drive a story forward. He is someone who would be fun to chat with over an interview. We would discuss process, storytelling in general, as well as social commentary and science fiction. In the end, what we would talk about would be the art of making comics. It’s not easy and, like the most complex of art forms, it seems to require a bit of magic. You will definitely find something magical about this graphic novel with its pacing, symbols, and daring.

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Indiegogo: THE EIGHTH, a New Adventure Comic

THE EIGHTH

The Eighth is a very impressive new comic book (now on Indiegogo) by Adam Lawson (writer/director of the YouTube Original series Escape The Night, and the gaming shows Tabletop and Spellslingers) and Lawson’s longtime collaborator, Jorin Evers. First, this is the premise: an epic adventure featuring two teenagers, David Wells and Emma Adachi, who unlock a piece of ancient Sumerian armor, but mismanage its power and end up committing murder. Before they know it, they find themselves on a terrifying journey to change or destroy the world with no going back. Now, the goal of the current Indiegogo campaign is to collect all the issues of the comic book into a glorious 200-page glossy trade paperback. As Adam Lawson puts it:

For almost two years, Jorin and I have slaved away on the pages completing five of the eight issues and given away all of our free time. With your contributions, we can take this across the finish and deliver into your hands, in stunning glossy print, the 200-page story of David, the 8th and his misfit friends.

David & Emma

Taking a close look at the first issue in this series, I see a well-paced story that got my attention right from the start. Writer/creator Adam Lawson and artist Jorin Evers deliver a gritty story playing with teenage wasteland tropes that ring very true. David is the math whiz who is being raised by his mother and aunt. Emma is a teen who ran away from her foster family and lives in the same house with David. Things look pretty dire and bleak. But there’s something about both David and Emma that leaves the reader wondering. There’s that touch of strange that means everything. Infused with just the right doses of horror, science fiction, and dark fantasy, this all adds up to a most unique and compelling story.

Out to save the world.

It will be up to David to see if he can rise to the challenge. As they say in scientific circles, the cat in the box is both alive and dead up until the box is opened. David makes the choice to open the box and find out. All along the way, the reader gets deeper into the action and more involved with the characters in unexpected ways. For instance, aloof and quiet Emma has got quite a steamy crush on David. The art by Jorin Evers brings it all to life with vivid energy. Lawson and Evers nicely set it up and then, bang, the reader is rewarded with a new twist on the superhero mythos. That twist is definitely there with just the right set of circumstances. Like any good thriller, it all comes down to being careful for what you wish for. But what’s the fun in being so careful, right? That’s the devil’s bargain that David and Emma will have to deal with. The promo material already alludes to a cosmic connection with Sumerian antiquity. Well, without spoiling anything, Lawson and Evers bring you a superhero story for a new generation, full of ugly truth and full of righteous fury. The Eighth truly feels like something new, a fresh take on superheroes, and that’s saying a lot.

Heroes Emerge!

THE EIGHTH has got just what you’re looking for in a story that’s not afraid to blast through the page. Check out the Indiegogo campaign right here. And you really need to check out the animated book trailer, only available by visiting the Indiegogo campaign.

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Comics Review: MeSseD

MeSseD

Comics Grinder continues to seek out and support the best in indie comics like this gem coming out of Cincinnati entitled, MeSseD, which is the nickname for the Metropolitan Sewer District! And, yes, if you sense a theme emerging here, you are correct. The main character is sewer worker Lilliput, a sort of tour guide to the weird, wild and wet world beneath our feet. Who exactly is Lilliput and what kind of misadventures does she get into? Let’s find out.

Issues of MeSseD

What wows me about this comic series is that creator/writer Jay B. Kalagayan, and lead artist Dylan Speeg, are not afraid to play with sci-fi tropes and just have some fun. Our main character, Lilliput, has one main responsibility and that’s to keep the effluent (sewage) flowing freely. But what fun is that? Well, it’s not exactly meant to be fun, is it? But it’s essential, right? You don’t want a day with the effluent NOT flowing, am I right? And it takes a lot to keep that flow going. There are all sorts of monsters out there, like the Clew worms, that need to be confronted and taken down. That’s where Lilliput comes in. Of course, she’s not perfect. For instance, she goes against regulations and keeps a pet rat. There’s much to love here.

Keep up with MeSseD by visiting the website right here.

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Interview: Steven Appleby and DRAGMAN

Dragman: Enough with the Secrets!

Steven Appleby is, among his many accomplishments, the creator of the comic strip, Small Birds Singing, and the BBC radio series Normal Life. One of Britain’s best loved cartoonists, his Loomus and other comic strips have appeared in newspapers and magazines internationally, and he has written and illustrated numerous books. His new book, Dragman, brings together themes dating back to Appleby’s early work in the ’80s in his comic strip, Rockets Passing Overhead, in New Musical Express.

From Steven Appleby’s comic strip, Loomus, in The Guardian

Indeed, Steven Appleby is a prominent cartoonist, illustrator and artist. Steven’s early career included creating cartoons for the legendary British humor magazine, Punch and a comic strip for the prestigious New Musical Express. This activity branched out in many directions, including many more comic strips, an animated series, a theater show, art shows, and many books, all the way to the new graphic novel, Dragman. Steven’s new book is about a superhero who can fly when he wears women’s clothes. As I point out in my review, this is a delightful tale about identity while also being a riveting thriller to boot. It is my pleasure to share with you this interview. A portion of the audio file is included at the end. During our conversation, we discuss process, a wonderful career, and the art of just being yourself.

Dragman by Steven Appleby

HENRY CHAMBERLAIN: Let’s jump in and discuss Dragman. First, let’s discuss a bit the title and main character. It seems to me that Dragman begs the question as to who is Dragman and the actual idea of dressing in drag. At one point in the book, the main character, August Crimp, takes issue with being called a dragman. Could you talk about that? 

STEVEN APPLEBY: The name Dragman comes from a comic strip I did for The Guardian. I was a transvestite in secret, this was around 2002, and so I was using that name. When I came around to creating the book, the name still had a nice ring to it. Drag is a different thing from trans. Back in the ‘70s and ‘80s, when I was experiencing cross-dressing in secret, the term, drag, clearly referred to performance. In the book, August is labeled as drag by the press and he resists but it sticks.

Dragman is truly a graphic novel in every sense, in terms of playing with words and images. You even have some wonderful prose passages that link up the narrative. I could easily see you writing the whole book as prose. Could you talk about the process of putting the book together?

It was really hard as I’d never done a project like this that is so long. I was used to doing short comic strips. I wanted to have everything in it: I wanted it to be funny, serious, have the superhero parody, be a thriller and be true to my own trans experience. That was difficult to do. I love writing prose and maybe I’ll do a prose book in the future. It was a lovely way to have a different sort of atmosphere and also not reveal the character who is referred to in the prose, keep that a secret for later in the book. It took me around two years to write it and I was creating little scenes, as in a play, but then I needed to figure out how to draw all that. At one point, I had written 40 pages of material that didn’t fit into comics. So, in a sense, it seems a wasteful process. But I love graphic novels. I love both the visual and prose side of it.

Captain Star in Steven Appleby’s comic strip, Rockets Passing Overhead, in New Musical Express

Your career is so impressive. You’re quite prolific. You’ve found ways to connect your work with other media. You’ve found ways to sustain your vision. What can you tell us about Dragman as part of your body of work?

Take a look at the early work, Captain Star in New Musical Express, the character there was obsessed and repressed. There are dressing up scenes. The navigator of the starship, Boiling Hell, he’s obsessed with fish. So, I had them all have obsessions, like my dressing up obsession. It’s all in there but coded in a different way. Dragman is the whole thing coming out into the open. I’ve lived dressing in women’s clothes for the last twelve years now. This is me being honest in my life, especially to my children. I didn’t want them to discover I had this big secret that they never knew about. So, I came out twelves years ago for that reason. I had such a warm reception from people I worked with, like at The Guardian. With the book, I wanted to explore all of that, the life I’d lived in secret, when nobody knew; and the parallel of superheroes who have secret identities.

Linda McCarthy’s adaptation of Appleby’s comic strip, Small Birds Singing

Could you tell us a bit about your influences? Perhaps you could talk about your studying under Quentin Blake?

I moved to London to go to the Royal College of Art. Quentin Blake was the head of the Illustration Department and he was my tutor. I wasn’t so much influenced by him in terms of actual drawing style but very much in terms of work processes. How he uses a lightbox. I find that I still use that way of working now: very loose rough drawings that you then place on a lightbox and ink very loosely. Yeah, he’s great, really inspirational. We still see each other from time to time.

Is the artwork in Dragman all hand-done or also digital? 

Mostly hand-done. It’s using that process that I just said. I do rough drawings and then ink them with an old-fashioned dip pen and India ink. Then I scan the art and print it out so that watercolor can be added. My ex, my wife Nicola, did the watercolor for me. She did it on a lightbox so that the line drawing and the watercolor are separate. I then would scan the watercolor and I manipulate the colors on the computer. I also addd skin tones, made colors richer, tweaked the colors and so on. The flashbacks scenes are all colored on the computer by me, a slightly muted, more monochromatic way. It’s really pretty traditional the way I’ve worked for years.

Steven Appleby, 2019

What can you share with us about growing up and discovering your creativity and who you wanted to be in the world?

I grew up in the north of England up near the border with Scotland, in a small village. We lived in a big old house, an old vicarage that my mum and dad had bought. It had leaky roofs and lowsome bedrooms. My mum and dad were in the ameuter dramatic society so they stored scenery in one of the out buildings. It was like a magical place growing up. When I was a little kid, I remember a room full of furniture and we’d go there to play. There were rooms that were never decorated and kept this old brown wallpaper from the ’20s. My mum drew comics in the ’30s in her school notebooks and that inspired me. We had New Yorker cartoons books with artists like Charles Addams and Ronald Searle. And I loved Dr. Suess as well. The artist who had a huge influence on me was Edward Goery. I discovered Gorey when I was in art school in the ’70s.  It wasn’t so much the drawing style that influenced me as much as the way that Gorey put things together. The surreal ideas, the macabre, in his books. I had thought that I could only  write and draw books for kids but Gorey showed me that you could really do anything. He liberated me.

Would you share with us a bit about being a professional cartoonist and maintaining a comic strip? I see there’s a recent collection of your Loomus comic strips in The Guardian.

I became a cartoonist kind of by accident, like many things that have happened in my life. It turned out to be perfect for me. I could write and draw as I wanted. I had this little space at the NME and I could do whatever I wanted as long as I didn’t go too crazy. At The Guardian, for example, where I was for 23 years, I think they only rejected two comic strips during the whole time I was there. I’ve always tried to do things that aren’t too topical but more just about life, what’s life all about, because I like it when you can return to the work like Edward Gorey–it’s not just a joke; it’s a comment on life. So, I’ve always tried to do that. And, I think a deadline focuses the mind. Mostly, it’s a good thing to have a deadline. There was a short period when I did a daily comic strip for a German newspaper while I also did my Guardian strip along with a few other things and that was like heading for a nervous breakdown, the amount of ideas I had to come up with. But I really did enjoy doing the comic strips. If I was still doing them, I wouldn’t have been able to do Dragman. It wouldn’t have been possible.

Excerpt from Loomus comic strip.

I know creating comic strips are quite time-consuming. I can recall my own comic strip work for my college paper. Among the many titles that readers can choose from, I highly recommend that folks check out a collection of your Loomus comic strips.

Thank you for mentioning that.

This is sort of a two-part question. What can you share with us about being trans and what can you tell young people about self-expression?

I would say that it’s something that’s been with me since my late teens, when it occurred to me that I could wear women’s clothes and having it be completely secret for 25 years. It was an engine that powered my work. In quite a lot of my comic strips and other work there are themes of secrets. I came across Philip K. Dick in my late teens. I loved his books because they have that constant theme that nothing is what it appears to be. That felt like my life that things weren’t what they appeared to be. In a funny way, when I started to come out to be siblings, family, and friends, and eventually work collegues, I kind of lost some of the mystical power of that secret that was an engine in my work. I found that very interesting.

I have two boys, who are now 24 and 22, and they are completely cool, as well as their friends, about me choosing to dress like this. I was so impressed how it didn’t phase them at all. They would be surprised if you ask them if it was difficult finding out and they’d say no. It was fine. I think, nowadays, it’s a very good time to not just to be trans but to be who you are. There are so many ways for people to be who they are. It seems to me to be a very good time.

Page from Dragman. Captain Star poster in the background.

It’s interesting to me to think about all the potential there is for everyone to veer off the status quo. For instance, a man can have his nails painted, crossing into a female-dominated domain. It seems like a small gesture but you are actually entering into a social exchange. If I were to get my nails painted, I’m engaging with the public–and that’s mostly about their curiosity.

I remember when my Captain Star character became a TV series back in the ’90s. I would paint my nails gold back then. And that would get commented on. One of the things that happens for me is that I use my name Steven and, when someone comes to the door, people will initially do a double take and then usually that opens up a conversation. I haven’t had a bad conversation yet. I agree with you that it’s something to deal with sometimes but it’s often in a positive way.

Share with us what lies ahead for you. Are there any final thoughts you’d like to share?

This is such a weird time. I’m sure it is in Seattle. It is in London. I’ve been ill lately and I can’t help but wonder if I’ve had the virus or not because they’re not testing people in the UK all that much. I think something having to do with all this will probably go into my next project, but I don’t know at the moment what that will be. I’m in this strange little time when Dragman has come out and I’m starting to think about what will come out next. For me, that process is partly an intellectual thinking of ideas and partly an emotional instinctive reaction to things. So, somehow I’m going to decide what I’m doing next.

I wish you great health and thank you for doing this interview.

It’s been a pleasure. Maybe we’ll meet the next time you’re in London.

Yes, absolutely.

That would be great.

Dragman is available as of April 7, 2020. For more details, visit the family of books at Macmillan Publishers right here.

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Comics Artist Juan Giménez Dies from COVID-19 (1943-2020)

The Metabarons

COVID-19 claims another life, artist Juan Giménez, who was beloved by many fans of the fanciful, associated with Alejandro Jodorowsky and Mœbius. Juan Giménez is best known for his work with Alejandro Jodorowsky on The Metabarons starting in 1992. A press release follows:

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GEORGE’S RUN releases for Small Press Expo Debut Sept 12-13, 2020

GEORGE’S RUN

The graphic novel, GEORGE’S RUN, is scheduled for a special indie release during Small Press Expo, September 12-13, 2020. This is a 200-page graphic novel that features the life and times of science fiction writer George Clayton Johnson. In his day, George earned his way into the inner circles of such legends as Rod Serling, Ray Bradbury, and cult literary favorites, Charles Beaumont, and Theodore Sturgeon.

GEORGE’S RUN is a story about storytelling. It’s not about just one thing and could easily be misunderstood but it’s worth giving it your attention.

Henry Chamberlain is your host. He is a cartoonist through and through. He wrote and drew this graphic novel that we’re talking about. Heck, our pal Hank has been behind the whole project from initial thumbnails to digital coloring. The guy could use a little help. For that, consider some of the awesome shout-outs he has earned from some VIPs who care about quality entertainment:

“It clearly is an act of passion!”

— Jeff Smith, creator of the comics series, Bone

“It’s really a one of a kind tale: a madcap ride back into our own pop culture told with a free-wheeling zest.

— Jerome Charyn, author of Cesare: A Novel of War-Torn Berlin

George Clayton Johnson’s Cafe Frankenstein

“GEORGE’S RUN tells the engaging story of George Clayton Johnson’s pivotal role in the core group of fantasy writers who wrote for The Twilight Zone and Star Trek, as well as his amazing novel Logan’s Run. Chamberlain’s graphic novel is a fascinating tribute to a writer who came out of nowhere to influence American fantasy writing forever.”

–Martin Olson, author of Encyclopaedia of Hell

George keeps on running!

GEORGE’S RUN

So, just to be clear, the book will make a number of introductions into the world with a special highlight being its SPX debut in September 2020. If SPX should be cancelled, it will still enjoy a special September online release. You can keep up with updates here and at the official website for the book. For all intents and purposes, you can consider the book published as of now since I’m providing you with an early bird view of it here.

As time progresses, you’ll be able to find GEORGE’S RUN in different formats and at other venues. A version in color will be out by September.

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Comics Spotlight: Diego Guerra

Page from The Island

Diego Guerra is a remarkable talent. It takes a lot to keep my interest and Guerra had me turning pages to The Island, an amazing work in comics that is currently in progress. I champion excellent storytellers and I am compelled to share them with you whenever possible. One Guerra title (with writer Justin Gray) that is available now is Lady Redbeard #1 and you can find it over at comiXology. But, while you’re there, take a closer look at a couple of other Guerra works. You’ll see him team up with writer Caje Brennan Knight for the quirky thriller, Mental Cases, and that’s very promising. But then look over to volume 3 of the comics anthology, Octal, and you’ll find Guerra’s excellent dystopian piece, The Foundling. The more Guerra is left to himself to grow, the better he gets! And that brings me back to The Island, which needs to come out as soon as possible. It is, without a doubt, an excellent example of the adult fantasy genre. I’m talking about comics that are truly intended for mature audiences that involve more complex and offbeat narratives, often mix in sci-fi themes and find that sweet spot of high art in erotica in the spirit of such greats as Alejandro Jodorowsky and Milo Manara. Diego Guerra is well inside that line of witty and sophisticated cartoonists. He is an artist, and writer, riding high, at the top of his game.

Excerpt from Diego Guerra and Justin Gray’s Lady Redbeard #1

Diego Guerra is an award-winning artist, animator, 3D modeler, director, producer, and former editor of Acme Comics. He was the director and producer of the animated feature, Desterrada (official selection in animation festivals from three continents). He has created more than 400 comic book pages for 15 clients in the last 3 years. In other words, Guerra is a seasoned pro and his polished and refined work demonstrates that.

From The Foundling

Keep up with Diego Guerra right here.

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Review: AN EMBARRASSMENT OF WITCHES by Sophie Goldstein and Jenn Jordan

An Embarrassment of Witches

An Embarrassment of Witches. Sophie Goldstein and Jenn Jordan. Top Shelf Productions, $19.99 (208p)

Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, make room for our main character, Rory Rosenberg, who could be called, Rory the Millennial Slacker. Cartoonist Sophie Goldstein’s new graphic novel, co-authored with Jenn Jordan, revels in the drama and the humor found within a community of young people who just happen to be supernatural. An Embarrassment of Witches has just been released by Top Shelf Productions.

An Embarrassment of Witches

Goldstein draws in a highly-composed and spare style which concentrates the action and evenly loads the page. Follow along the path led by a series of short lines forming simple shapes, all the better to focus the viewer’s attention onto one spot. A deftly-drawn hand becomes a container which acts like a picture frame, bouncing the viewer’s attention back if it starts to drift off. Like a neon light, well-executed drawings keep your attention steadily connecting from one spot to the next. Goldstein keenly understands the power of comics. Her work catapults the reader into the story. We quickly get it that Rory has just been abandoned by her boyfriend and that she does not do well with change nor with plans for the future. And then, just as we’re processing that, we quickly accept that she’s a witch in a supernatural world of witches, dragons, and hobgoblins. It’s up to Rory to figure out her next move, especially after she has to backtrack on a much anticipated vacation which was supposed to allow her more time to relax and not think about her future.

An Embarrassment of Witches

Goldstein is a 2013 graduate of the prestigious Center for Cartoon Studies. The very next year, she won the much coveted Ignatz Award for her mini-comic, House of Women, Part I. In 2017, House of Women was collected and published by Fantagraphics. In 2015, Goldstein released The Oven, published by AdHouse Books. House of Women and The Oven are quite different but share the same off kilter sensibility. Goldstein clearly has a magic way with a touch of strange. Both stories are set on other worlds and, while the characters deal with universal struggles, everything is spiked with a deliciously unsettling quality. It’s as if Goldstein figured out the look and feel to her universe of comics ahead of time and then moved forward with a very distinctive and purposeful vision.

An Embarrassment of Witches

As if often the case with comics of the highest caliber, much of the fun is simply going along the journey. It matters little if Rory becomes a veterinarian or a talk show host. The reader is hooked and is rooting for Rory, in the same spirit as we all root for Sabrina and for Buffy.

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Comics in 2020: BEEHIVE BOOKS

Page from the upcoming PETER PAN: excerpt from Brecht Evens’s Neverland.

We begin a whole new decade and I’m as excited as any of you! I feel that we have no time to lose to own this new emerging era. As for the world of comics and graphic novels, I direct your attention to a new leader in all things beautiful and unusual, the publisher, Beehive Books. Beehive Books has demonstrated a commitment to excellence that will only continue to grow into 2020 and beyond. Here are some compelling facts and enticing news from Beehive Books:

DRACULA: THE EVIDENCE

In 2019, our first titles landed in book stores, and the world began to take notice of the strange magic brewing in West Philadelphia. Thanks to the unsurpassed talents of Paul Kepple, Yuko Shimizu, Justin Duerr, Ronald Wimberly, Bill Sienkiewicz, Guillermo Del Toro, Michael Cunningham, Paul Pope, Omar Abdullah, Ramsey Campbell, Denis & Violet Kitchen, Gary Panter and many more, we ended the year with a lot more trophies, statues, plaques, clippings, plaudits and honors than we began it with.

ARTEMISIA

At Beehive we don’t believe in Instagrammish humble-bragging, so here’s some straight up old fashioned bragging about things we did this year

ILLUMINATED EDITIONS

We are, first and foremost, dreamers of the wild-eyed variety. But publishing, this exercise in the possible, requires a keen eye on the bottom line. We’re learning to be better business-people as we go.

Due to the intimacy of our thousand-odd readership, the projects that have sustained us financially and kept this ship afloat have been the ambitious and elaborate (read: expensive) ones — our entirely implausible experimental briefcase-housed ephermeral facsimile of Bram Stoker’s Dracula; great books of the past, gloriously illuminated by the greatest cartoonists and graphic artists of the day; giant, deluxe, painstakingly researched monographs on master artists like Harrison Cady and Herbert Crowley, whose brilliant work must be saved from slipping into the forgotten past.

LAAB MAGAZINE #4: This Was Your Life!

Next year we want to push even further in the direction of our more elaborate and ambitious projects. Bizarre formats, profuse box sets, paper sculptures, printed art objects, limited edition handmade artist books… Startling voices, forgotten treasures, otherworldly inventions. Books within books and wheels within wheels. Our ambition is to build paper worlds into which our readers can disappear. Refuge from the quick-and-dirty disposability of an increasingly digital and mass-manufactured world. And if you have your own ideas for any projects that push the boundaries of publishing, we always love to hear your thoughts and submissions! Drop us a line at info@beehivebooks.com, or encourage your friends to do so.

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