Tag Archives: Music

Review: MOZART IN PARIS

Mozart on the search for empathy and recognition.

A genius is not always fortunate to be appreciated in his own time. That was the fate of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. You would think that he’d get some love in such a sophisticated place as Paris but, back in 1778, he needed to hustle in order to get recognition. And Mozart was not one who easily hustled. He repeatedly had to fight for the right to be acknowledged as an artist on his own terms. Frantz Duchazeau brings that struggle to life in his new graphic novel, Mozart in Paris, published by SelfMadeHero, an imprint of Abrams, available starting October 8, 2019.

A genius in Paris.

Mozart is Mozart, who can deny that? Maybe Salieri? You’ll know what I mean if you’ve seen 1984’s Amadeus. But even Salieri, the rival and villain in that movie, had the good sense to know he was dealing with a genius composer. In this graphic novel, we get a wonderful look at the reality of indifference and shortsightedness. French tastemakers, threatened or indifferent to Mozart’s original and innovative music, would try to keep him out of the limelight. Mozart’s own father was relentless in dismissing Mozart’s efforts but, to his credit, he was dealing with a highly precocious individual who did not calm more conservative nerves.

MOZART IN PARIS by Frantz Duchazeau

Mozart didn’t think it was really up to him to convince anyone of his skill and talent. That kind of attitude doesn’t come without a price. Frantz Duchazeau does a wonderful job of showing the reader just what price Mozart had to pay for his own brand of naive arrogance. What if he had only held back and allowed someone to receive a false compliment? What if he had held back and not insulted a rival?

Mozart, as instructor.

Duchazeau has quite an engaging way with the page. Of all the comics I’ve been reading lately, he is definitely among those I see with a magical touch. As if evoking the grace and uncanny elegance of Mozart’s music, Duchazeau balances an engaging mix of variety upon the page with nicely modulated recurring elements, like the way he constructs his panels with one center panel speaking to the bigger picture.  In the two examples on display in this review, you have Mozart in the center of one page seeking consensus on his genius. On another page, he is at the center again, but this time he must restrain himself for the sake of his beloved pupil.

Mozart, a young man in a hurry.

Sometimes you must fold your wings in order to someday spread them. That is, unless you’re Mozart. But, on the other hand, this is also the story of a young man in the big city. Mozart was only 22 years-old during this early visit to Paris. And Mozart was driven and had no time to waste. Duchazeau guides the reader through Mozart’s bumpy ride as he stumbles and gets that much closer to his destiny.

Run, Mozart, Run!

Mozart in Paris is a 96-page full color trade paperback, published by SelfMadeHero, an imprint of Abrams, available starting October 8, 2019.

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Filed under Comics, Graphic Novel Reviews, Music, Paris

Interview: Abby London and 50 Ways to Boot the Seattle City Council

In Seattle, if you’re concerned about public safety, you shouldn’t also have to worry about being labeled a NIMBY but that’s a problem with Seattle politics. It’s become such a problem that frustrated citizens are more than ready for a change in their so-called progressive city government. Well, I put on my reporter’s hat again and interviewed singer/songwriter Abby London who debuted a music video that speaks to many of us in Seattle who are simply looking for a fresh new approach and some common sense when it comes to issues of housing, homelessness, and public safety.

Sergio for city council. A campaign with style and substance that has struck a chord.

In my interview, Abby speaks with great conviction about how she can’t recommend Seattle right now to out-of-state friends. This concern rings true with so many people here in Seattle and beyond. It’s not very difficult for folks outside Seattle to relate with. We close our interview with a call for all Seattle voters to get out and vote in the August 6th primary election. Don’t be left out!

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Filed under Commentary, Homeless, Interviews, Music, NIMBY, Seattle

Interview: Mariel Darling, A Portait of a Singer

Mariel Darling illustration by Henry Chamberlain

It is truly a pleasure to share with you a rising talent, singer-songwriter Mariel Darling. You might think of her as a future Taylor Swift or Lady Gaga. Who knows? She certainly has got talent and determination and, at 16, she has some solid songs like “No Mirrors” and “Unknown,” to show for it and a work ethic going back to the age of nine. So, yes, Ms. Darling is the real deal. I believe in Mariel Darling. So much so that I created the above illustration. Mariel, if you ever need an artist for an album cover, I’d be more than happy to do it.

A Western Massachusetts native, 16-year-old Mariel Darling started recording music when she was only nine years old after being discovered by manager Jackie Sarkis (formerly of Radio Disney) and working with producer Shaun Bless, and by age ten she was already turning heads performing at the New York Knicks halftime show. Even in her early years, the young singer knew that she wanted to use her talent to help promote positive messages, and by eleven she was already hard at work writing and performing songs for the National Education Institute encouraging other kids in a fun and upbeat way to read, study, and focus on their education as a way to further their well-being. These initiatives lead Darling to perform on bigger national stages and festivals including the Maritime Festival, Washington D.C.’s CureFest for Childhood Cancer, and the Camplified Tour which saw her perform in front of thousands of teens and tweens at summer camps across the nation at fourteen.

Mariel enjoys motivating her fans with her music. During our conversation, Mariel said she’s excited about connecting with the huge fan base of girls and young women who follow her music. She’s proud of her songs, like “No Mirrors,” that resonate with her fans and speak to positive self-image and empowerment. And another more recent song, “Unknown,” speaks to the challenges in young lives in facing the unknown. Mariel says she admires those performers that are able to reach out like Taylor Swift and Billie Eilish. No doubt, you can add Mariel Darling to the short list of the best influencers. Listen to my interview by clicking the link below:

Keep up with Mariel Darling on Instagram right here.

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Filed under Art by HANK, Entertainment, Interviews, Mariel Darling, Music, Women

Review: THE BEATLES IN COMICS, published by NBM Graphic Novels

THE BEATLES IN COMICS, published by NBM Graphic Novels

We all have our favorite Beatles story or moment. There are so many to choose from: Ed Sullivan, the Maharishi, Yoko Ono, and so on. The Beatles in Comics, a new anthology from NBM Graphic Novels, does a wonderful job of sorting out fact from fiction and proves to make a great Beatles keepsake. You can see it as an ultimate scrapbook as it’s everything a Beatles fan would want to include in a tribute and then some.

From “Scrambled Eggs” to “Yesterday”

There are so many iconic landmarks along the way. Take, for example, the story behind one Beatles pivotal song, “Yesterday.” Paul McCartney says that he had a dream that gave him the melody. It was only much later, about a year or so, that he finally gave it lyrics. Until then, it went by the name, “Scrambled Eggs.”

The Beatles meet the Maharishi

Another example is the famous trip to India to confer with the Maharishi. This portion of the book is a prime example of how each segment is built up: some introductory notes, some actual photos and reference material, and then the comics. Each section has a different cartoonist at the helm. The whole volume is utterly remarkable in how it seems to effortlessly manage to substantially cover everything from the band’s initial formation all the way to their inevitable breakup.

The Beatles in Comics is a 224-page full color hardcover published by NBM Graphic Novels.

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Filed under Comics, graphic novels, NBM Publishing, pop culture, The Beatles, The Sixties

SPX Comics Review: GOOD KINGS BING & BOWIE SWING

GOOD KINGS BING & BOWIE SWING

Good Kings Bing & Bowie Swing, published by Brain Cloud Comics, is a comic book with a gentle, quirky, and upbeat theme. I’m always fascinated with the innate ability of comics to crossover into various subjects and demographics. It sounds sort of counterintuitive to say but comics are not just for comics enthusiasts. Comics will always surprise you with how elastic it is and how broad its appeal is. This can apply for any comic, even a comic that may have, by all intents and purposes, been created with a small group of readers in mind. So, this is a lengthy way of saying that I see this weird and funny book as being something a lot of readers will enjoy!

Bing Crosby and David Bowie to the rescue!

It’s remarkable to see how well the creative team (written by Jim Ousley; illustrated by Carlos Gabriel Ruiz; lettered by Brandon Daniels) works with its chosen subject: an enhanced/fanciful look beyond that time that Bowie and Bing sang together on a holiday special. For this book, this unlikely dynamic duo is lending a helping hand to those in distress.

Brain Cloud Comics offers a wide variety of quality comics. I go back with this publisher to my reviewing one of its earliest projects, Pretentious Record Store Guy. You can read my review right here. And you can read my interview with creator Carlos Gabriel Ruiz right here. What I enjoyed about this book was its irreverence and style. When you reach that sweet spot of irony, it’s something special. That said, this Bowie/Bing comic gives us a taste of that.

If you are heading out to Small Press Expo this weekend, be sure to stop by at Table B10 and visit Brain Cloud Comics. You will find the SPX debut of Good Kings Bing & Bowie Swing as well as the debut of Blood on the Track #2, plus many more titles.

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Filed under Brain Cloud Comics, Carlos Gabriel Ruiz, Comics, Independent Comics, Indie, Small Press Expo

Comics Review: THE BEATLES YELLOW SUBMARINE

“Beatles: Yellow Submarine,” an official illustrated adaptation published by Titan Comics

An announcement about a graphic novel based on The Beatles Yellow Submarine was one of the most popular posts on Comics Grinder. Well, here is a full-on review (with video) that delves right into the book! This is the official illustrated adaptation, published by Titan Comics.

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of The Beatles Yellow Submarine comes this fully authorized graphic novel adaptation! We all know the story:

When the music-hating Blue Meanies invade the underwater paradise of Pepperland, the Captain of the Yellow Submarine sails away to find help… and stumbles upon The Beatles! Can the Fab Four free Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, return music to Pepperland, and overthrow the evil Blue Meanies through the power of love?

This book beautifully and faithfully adapts all the antics and charm of the original animated feature. It’s genius to create such a work. Who doesn’t love The Beatles? And who can resist a book that transports you to Pepperland and beyond? Here is a perfect gift for any Beatles fan. And it can make for a dazzling bedtime story too!

THE BEATLES YELLOW SUBMARINE

The layout to this work is quite impressive. The pacing is spot on as it captures the wacky and irreverent humor. An adaptation of this scope and significance requires a master and that is exactly what we get from writer/artist Bill Morrison, co-founder of Bongo Comics, artist on classic Disney posters, and editor of Mad Magazine. Usually, it works the other way around but Mr. Morrison has managed to take a legendary work in animation and find a viable graphic novel counterpart. He has done a wonderful job of sequencing a narrative from something that is both iconic and rather loopy and might seem impossible to properly transfer from one medium to another.

There is plenty to love here. All you need is love, right?

The Beatles Yellow Submarine is a 112-page hardcover, in full color, published by Titan Comics.

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Filed under Comics, Graphic Novel Reviews, graphic novels, Music, pop culture, The Beatles, Titan Comics

Music Review: ‘Nowhere Land’ by Olivia Olson

NOWHERE LAND by Olivia Olson

Los Angeles is both magical and manic. Entertainer Olivia Olson should know. Just take a listen to her song, “Los Angeles,” from her newly-released album, Nowhere Land. A mellow vibe belies a darker outlook. Among her credits, Olivia can proudly claim to be the voice of Marceline the Vampire Queen on Cartoon Network’s Adventure Time. She’s an L.A. kid through and through. So, she means what she says with lyrics like, “So what if I’m scandalous…I’m so Los Angeles…I’m so over the hills, so under the spell…Is it heaven or hell?…I’m so Los Angeles.”

“Los Angeles” sets the tone for an album with a youthful kick. There’s a powerful vibe to such torch songs as “Chasing Your Chances,” “Anyway,” and “Tore Up.” Each one of these nine tracks is a piece to a puzzle revealing a complex artist with a multi-layered vision. If you’re searching, and a little bit lost in the big city, this is the album for you.

Olivia says that she is very proud of the team she worked with to put this album together. As an independent artist, she looks forward to spreading the word and folks enjoying what they hear.

Nowhere Land is available on all the major music platforms including iTunes.

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Filed under Music, Music Reviews, Olivia Olson

Seattle Art Fair 2017: Much to See and Buy!

Kurt Cobain, Incesticide. Courtesy of UTA Artist Space.

The Seattle Art Fair (August 3-6) offers much to see and to buy. The whole idea is to offer in one space an opportunity for a varied audience to engage with some of the best contemporary art around the world. The 2017 edition features 99 galleries representing 30 cities globally, with 58 from the Pacific Rim alone, in addition to lectures and specially commissioned installations. UTA Artist Space, for example, brings the first-ever exhibition focusing on the visual art of Kurt Cobain to the Seattle Art Fair. It includes previously unseen notebooks as well as two original paintings by Cobain. An additional piece that Nirvana fans will undoubtedly recognize is this collaged cover of the band’s 1992 Incesticide compilation.

From Joshua Liner Gallery: Riusuke Fukahori’s
The Ark (Goldfish Salvation), 2015

If you are in the Seattle area, you can still catch the final day of Seattle Art Fair this Sunday. And, if you should not be able to make it, be sure to visit the Seattle Art Fair website for details on all the participating galleries. The following is my recap of my visit on Saturday. There are a number of ways to take it the show with countless observations to make and insights to gain. Here are a few of mine.

Sean Townley’s 7 Diadems, 2016.

Be sure to look twice. While many of us believe we’ve seen it all, there is a part of us ready to be astonished. But you need to really look. Take, for instance, a row of what appear to be pods floating along a strip of the showroom floor. Upon a closer look, they appear to be heads reminiscent of the Statue of Liberty. Are they emerging with the truth and rising to the top? Read more regarding Townley’s work at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts right here.

C24 Gallery: Carole Feuerman’s City Slicker

The art is alive. Engage with it as it is already engaging with you or so it certainly seems. Carole Feuerman’s City Slicker was a crowd favorite. Represented by C24 Gallery.

Forum Gallery: Bo Bartlett’s Object Lesson, 2017

The art is there to provoke. Welcome a new conversation as art provokes new thoughts and renewed debate, like Bo Bartlett’s Object Lesson, represented by Forum Gallery.

Forum Gallery: Xenia Hausner’s Gone Girl, 2014

Lose yourself. Art can certainly be as fun as it is intense. Consider Xenia Hausner’s Gone Girl, represented by Forum Gallery.

Winchester Galleries: Joe Fafard’s Lucien Freud, 2014

Art will shock. Art takes seriously its option to shock. It can be intense or it can be more of a whimsical nudge like, Joe Fafard’s 2014 tribute in bronze to painter Lucien Freud. Fafard is represented by Winchester Galleries.

Shift Gallery Seattle: Eric Day Chamberlain’s Red Plate Yellow Background, 2016

Art will soothe. Art also prides itself in its ability to calm. Consider Eric Day Chamberlain’s Red Plate Yellow Background, 2016. Chamberlain is represented by Shift Gallery Seattle.

David Zwirner Gallery: Andy Warhol’s Astronauts, 1963

Pay respect. You are among some of the best art galleries in the world, like David Zwirner Gallery. You will be treated to some of the biggest names in art and perhaps in a whole new light, like the above Andy Warhol’s Astronauts, 1963.

Backslash gallery: American artist Fahamu Pecou

Art keeps you strong. Especially during these very troubled times. Backslash gallery is pleased to present a solo show with works especially realized for the fair by American artist Fahamu Pecou whose large painting Daedalus Upliftment was acquired by the Seattle Art Museum last year.

KRUPIC KERSTING II KUK: Tracey Snelling’s Lost City

Discover. Keep your eyes peeled and your mind open. You will be rewarded by something fresh and new, like Tracey Snelling’s Lost City, represented by KRUPIC KERSTING II KUK.

A Seattle Art Fair video recap:

Keep up with Seattle Art Fair right here.

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Filed under Art, Kurt Cobain, Seattle, Seattle Art Fair

The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine Adapted as Graphic Novel

“Beatles: Yellow Submarine,” an official illustrated adaptation published by Titan Comics

What could be sweeter than a graphic novel adaptation of The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine? Yes, Titan Comics has announced a licensing agreement with Apple Corps Ltd to publish such a work! The fan base for The Beatles is in a league all its own so this is a huge deal. If no Blue Meanies get in the way, the book will coincide with the animated film’s 50th Anniversary!

“Beatles: Yellow Submarine,” an official illustrated adaptation published by Titan Comics

The comic adaptation will be written and illustrated by Bill Morrison, Bongo Comics co-founder and creative director, as well as recently announced Executive Editor for MAD Magazine. The Beatles: Yellow Submarine official illustrated adaptation will launch in stores in 2018, to coincide with the 50th Anniversary of the animated musical fantasy film released in July 1968.

“Beatles: Yellow Submarine,” an official illustrated adaptation published by Titan Comics

Directed by George Dunning, Yellow Submarine was an animated adventure inspired by the music of The Beatles. Band members Paul, John, George, and Ringo join Captain Fred in his Yellow Submarine to journey to Pepperland to help free the land from the music-hating Blue Meanies.

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Filed under Comics, graphic novels, pop culture, The Beatles, Titan Comics

Review: COADY AND THE CREEPIES #1 (of 4)

COADY AND THE CREEPIES #1

Here is a comic with a twist on Scooby and the gang. Instead of a bunch of ghost-hunting teenagers, what if one of those meddling kids was already a ghost? Writer Liz Prince (Tomboy, Will You Still Love Me If I Wet the Bed?) and artist Amanda Kirk team up for this four-issue comic book series, COADY AND THE CREEPIES, published by BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios.

In this first issue, we are introduced to a triplet sister band, The Creepies, with Criss, Corey, and Coady Castoff. They are all involved in a tragic van accident that scars Corey, leaves Criss in a wheelchair, and kills their tour manager…and, unbeknownst to them, actually kills Coady. She’s now a ghost, you see, although not fully aware of it at the start of our story.

Page excerpt from COADY AND THE CREEPIES

A fun part to this comic is that this is not your typical pop band scene. Instead, Prince went with a punk scene and plays with that harder edge. It’s all about attitude and keeping face. The guys in the band, The Boneheads, are especially competitive–and obnoxious. Check out the energy in Kirk’s drawing, reminiscent of Gary Panter. This comic packs a lot of power!

This is an inventive and engaging supernatural/band on the run mashup. And there’s plenty of local flavor too. Just as Coady is getting a handle on not exactly being alive anymore, everyone must deal with the ghost of La Llorona who haunts the Santa Fe River. That definitely conjures up a Dia de los Muertos vibe. Lots going on for a first issue. In terms of a rating, I give it a full four stars.

Coady and the Creepies #1 is available as of March 15th. For more details, visit BOOM! Studios right here.

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Filed under Amanda Kirk, Boom! Studios, Comics, Comics Reviews, Ghosts, Liz Prince, Supernatural